New Year’s Resolutions for a Healthy Lawn

Six Easy Steps for Maintaining a Beautiful Outdoor Living Space

home lawn

Maintaining a healthy, vibrant lawn is simple when you follow these basic six steps.

Lawn care doesn’t have to be complicated. By selecting premium Harmony Turfgrass, you’ve already simplified the process. This year, spend more of your time enjoying your yard and less time maintaining it.

Warm Season Grass Resolutions

  1. I WILL keep my lawn free of leaves, pine straw and debris. Left on your lawn, these will block sunlight and hold extra moisture against your turf. Pine needles take even longer than leaves to break down. Helpful tip: Mow regularly to chop or mulch the leaves. Rake the pine needles and use them as mulch for plants that like a more acidic soil, such as azaleas and gardenias
  2. By the time the dogwoods are in full bloom, I WILL apply pre-emergent weed control so I don’t have weeds this summer. Do this early in the growing season to control broadleaf weeds and crabgrass. Helpful tip: Monitor your soil temperature about a half inch below the surface. Crabgrass seeds germinate at about 52 degrees, so you’ll want to take action just before the ground reaches that temperature.
  3. I WILL patch any bare areas with new sod to help establish a full and healthy lawn. First, get the area down to bare ground, and loosen the soil with a tiller. Helpful tip: Try to determine why the area is bare. If it’s getting more shade or higher traffic than the rest of your yard, you may want to choose a different type of Harmony Turfgrass.
  4. I WILL dethatch and aerate this spring after risk of frost has passed so the lawn is nice and healthy this summer. Over time, mulched grass blades, leaves and other organic material can build up, creating a thick thatch between the grass blades and soil line. This can inhibit nutrient absorption. Aerating annually helps to minimize thatch buildup. Helpful tip: To check your thatch thickness, dig out a small square of sod, including its roots. If there is more than a half inch of buildup between the grass blades and soil blades, you should probably aerate.
  5. I WILL treat my lawn for bugs this summer. A good pest control program uses all control methods including insecticides, biological and environmental controls. Helpful tip: Rotate your insecticides so that bugs don’t become immune to what you’re using.
  6. I WILL winterize my lawn this fall so it looks great next spring. Mow your lawn short before storing your mower for the season, and fertilize it to provide nutrients throughout the cold months. Helpful tip: Removing lawn ornaments and debris will help prevent dead spots next spring.

Cool Season Grass Resolutions

  1. raking the lawn

    Keeping the lawn free of debris helps prevent thatch. Alternative? Mulch the debris and let it feed the lawn naturally.

    I WILL keep my lawn free of leaves, pine straw and debris. Allowing leaves to remain on your lawn promotes mold and dead spots. Snow may keep the debris out of sight, but the damage will be evident in the spring. Helpful tip: If you don’t have a mulching lawn mower, consider raking leaves and pine straw, then use them to protect plant beds. They’ll gradually decompose and add nutrients to the soil.

  2. I WILL not remove more than 1/3 of the leaf blade at one mowing. Cutting off too much can increase your lawn’s susceptibility to weeds and diseases. Helpful tip: If rain or vacation prevent you from mowing and your grass gets too tall, mow more frequently until it’s the right height.
  3. I WILL apply only one inch of water per week to my lawn. This encourages deep root growth, and helps prevent runoff. Helpful tip: Place an empty tuna can at the farthest point in the spray pattern. Turn on the sprinkler and check the time. When the can is full, that’s how long it takes for your system to produce one inch of water.
  4. By the time the dogwoods are in full bloom, I WILL apply pre-emergent weed control so I don’t have weeds this summer. Do this early in the growing season to control broadleaf weeds and crabgrass. Helpful tip: Monitor your soil temperature about a half inch below the surface. Crabgrass seeds germinate at about 52 degrees, so you’ll want to take action just before the ground reaches that temperature.
  5. I WILL aerify my lawn in the fall to relieve compaction and help my lawns roots grow deep. Dethatch and aerate cool-season grasses in early fall. This gives your lawn plenty of growing time to recover. Helpful hint: Compost the debris and use it as a soil conditioner.
  6. I WILL get a soil test to make sure my pH is between 6.0-7.0, and to see if I have any fertility deficiencies. Most home improvement centers carry soil test kits. Test soil in the late fall or early spring, so adjustments can be made before the peak growing season. Helpful hint: Use a dry sample. Wet soil readings may not be accurate.

Keeping a healthy lawn is easy when you have the right type of grass for your climate and follow these basic steps. You’ll not only help the earth by providing more oxygen, filtering water and preventing run-off, you’ll also provide you and your family a healthy play space to exercise and socialize. And that’s why we say green is good!

 

 

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